Sometimes, even out best efforts aren’t enough to keep plaque from hardening into tartar on our teeth. But that’s why a teeth cleaning is one of the most common and least expensive procedures offered at dental offices. But what happens when a standard teeth cleaning isn’t enough? What happens when tartar begins to form beneath the gum line? It those cases, a deep cleaning is needed. Take a look at scaling and root planing, collectively known as a “deep cleaning,” and learn how it can help keep your teeth and gums safe when threatened by irreversible damage from gum disease.
 
The Procedure
One of the goals of a deep cleaning is to remove tartar, hardened plaque, that has built up on the roots of teeth beneath the gum line. Another key objective of a deep cleaning is to remove the bacterial pockets that form between the teeth and gum as gum disease progresses. You’ll be given a local anesthetic to hide any discomfort you might feel during the procedure. From there, your dental hygienist will begin cleaning your teeth, removing the dental tartar from your teeth, above and below the gum line, in a process that’s known as “scaling.” After scaling, your dentist will then smooth the roots of your teeth so that the gums adhere to them uniformly. This process is known as “root planing.”
 
Considerations
Often times, scaling and root planing can be completed in a single appointment. However, you may need a followup appointment if the tartar buildup is extensive. And if the buildup is indeed extensive, you may require a related procedure often referred to as “deep pocket elimination.” This process entails clearing deep bacterial pockets and readjusting the gums so that they can reattach to the teeth uniformly. Stitches may be required to hold the gums in place until they’ve reattached and healed.

Talk with a Periodontist in Chicago, IL
Take a moment to schedule a consultation with a local periodontist in Chicago, IL and Oakbrook Terrace, IL to learn more about scaling and root planing and any other dental procedure.